New prospects for the coated variety— “Russian breeders are trying to keep this wonderful breed alive.”

RUSSIA:

New prospects for the coated variety

“Russian breeders are trying to keep this wonderful breed alive.”

Lucy Nikitochkina and Flora (Hloris Flora van Edelsieger / Perro sin pelo del Perú con Pelo.). Photo ©Lucy Nikitochkina

Lucy Nikitochkina lives in the Russian capital, Moscow, and is the current President of the “Peruvian Hairless Dog” National Club (Национальный клуб породы “перуанская голая собака” — НКП перуанская голая собака), founded in February 2010 with the main goal protecting and promoting this breed.

She tells us: “Our club is not big but its members are true enthusiasts of this breed. It’s made up of a team of friends who work together, and the Peruvian Hairless Dogs are the main members of that great family.”

In addition, since 1995, she and Olga, her mother, run a kennel of this breed called Van Edelsieger. Their kennel has received awards in the last European canine championships of 2016 and 2017 as the best Peruvian Hairless Dog kennel. In it, they not only dedicate themselves to the health of their dogs through health exams (eye, DNA, heart exams, etc.) but also through physical activities (swimming and general training) that ensure their dogs are in optimal health and physical condition, so the happy family that chooses them will be able to enjoy their company for a long time.

Both, mother and daughter, are passionate about national and international canine competitions. It is there where one can witness the progress of their work because the awards obtained in competition demonstrate their effort in the selection and breeding of their dogs.

“But we’re just barely at the beginning of a long road to travel in the breeding of the coated variety,” says Lucy.

Catedral de San Basilio, Moscú. Photo by Mauricio Álvarez Art design by Alessandro Pucci appp-adpp©2019

Russia, a nation with over 142 million inhabitants, has more than 15 million pet dogs. Of those, today, 250 are Peruvian Hairless Dogs, and this number continues to grow. Russia has 5 Hairless Dogs kennels. Moreover, it has a national club that promotes activities in favor of this breed. Lastly, all Russian Peruvian Hairless Dog kennels have both varieties: hairless and coated. (http://www.fci.be/es/statistics/ByNco.aspx?iso=RU)

 

Flora (Hloris Flora van Edelsieger / Ejemplar Perro sin pelo del Perú con Pelo). Photo ©Lucy Nikitochkina

“I was very interested in understanding why Peruvian Hairless Dogs have no hair,” says Lucy. “I studied about the FOXI3 gene, which is responsible for the lack of hair. I knew Peruvian Hairless Dogs had a coated variety. My first coated dog was born before the August 13, 2013 standard, which is why I didn’t include her in the breeding program. She was born in my kennel. Her name is Avrora Astra Eos van Edelsieger—at home we call her Avrora. Avrora taught me coated dogs are even sweeter than naked ones. Unfortunately, I had to sell her as a pet and she has no offspring. But after the new standard came into effect I understood I had to include the furry ones in my breeding program. Currently, I have some I’ll use for breeding who are also successfully participating in dog shows.”

FCI – Standard-FCI N° 310: “The recognition of the coated variety, for show and for breeding, favours the expansion of genetic variability, improving the breed’s strength and attracts new breeders.”

Litter “H” – Kennel van Edelsieger from Russia. 100% Peruvian origin pups. Photo ©Lucy Nikitochkina

FCI – Standard-FCI N° 310: “… Disdained from any breeding program, its current recognition in the light of developments in the study of its genome emphasizes the genetic value of the breed and contributes to its development and preservation. The recognition of the coated variety, for show and for breeding, favours the expansion of genetic variability, improving the breed’s strength and attracts new breeders. Initially to be registered, the coated variety must be the product of two hairless dogs duly registered in a stud book or breeding record. The coated variety can only be mated to a hairless specimen of the breed and subsequently also for generations to come. The mating between coated specimens is banned, just like the registrations of these in any studbooks without duly registered parents.”

Lucy Nikitochkina and Flora (Hloris Flora van Edelsieger). Photo by Mauricio Álvarez – appp-adpp©2019

Lucy tells us the challenge of the coated variety issues from the fact that, by definition, the breed is best known for its hairless specimens—which are, in themselves, already rather exotic. Many canine judges do not know the breed very well and, when they see a dog of the same breed that is furry, they are impressed. This, however, does not discourage Russian breeders, whose sole objective is to show the world how beautiful this variety is.

“Hloris Flora van Edelsieger,” Lucy says, “—we call her Flora. Flora is a little dog with sandy hair, small size (measures 33 cm.), and has a nice type. Flora won in her class at the 2017 Euro Dog Show and the 2017 World Dog Show. Flora is very successful and is making an excellent campaign for the recognition of her variety. In addition, she has won first place along with the hairless variety, which is a great success.”

“At the 2017 World Dog Show in Leipzig–Germany,” Lucy continues, “even more coated dogs participated [5 coated ones and 67 hairless, for a total of 72 Peruvian dogs (https://www.wds2017.de/fileadmin/media/wds/meldestatistik/Statistic_of_entries_WDS_2017.pdf) and, as always, I thought that the coated variety is a detector of the line preferred by a certain kennel. In fact, this variety helps improve the Hairless Dog, while dogs without hair, don’t. If you look closely at the coated dog you’ll understand: some coated dogs look more like other breeds rather than the Peruvian Hairless Dog. And I like the line of coated dogs because they resemble my own image of the ideal Peruvian Hairless Dog.

Ejemplar Perro sin pelo del Perú con Pelo.
Hrista Citera Van Edelsieger de la criadora Lucy Nikitochkina de Rusia
© Lucy Nikitochkina

“Some time ago,” Lucy continues, “the European breeders and I discussed the fact that now there are more and more coated dogs being born. Regrettably, in Russia some coated dogs were sacrificed before this variety was recognized as an official breed. I believe some European breeders sacrificed coated dogs, too. I think the recognition of the coated variety gave [these dogs] the opportunity to live. Our breed is unique and we mustn’t lose the genetic contribution coated dogs when bred. I really hope the Coated Peruvian Hairless Dog becomes even more well known in my country. Our country is very big and this breed (both hairless and coated) could make many people happy. It’s a very affectionate breed that gives more love and happiness to its owners. Now, several excellent actual Peruvian specimens

Catedral de Cristo Salvador de Moscú. Photo: appp-adpp©2019

have been imported into Russia. I’ve met some people who’re simply in love with the breed and who help us at the kennel. They’re now part of our family of breeders. And the quality of the dogs being born in Russia is today much better than in the past. Russian breeders are trying to keep this wonderful breed alive.

 

 

For Russian, you can visit the following link:

(In Russian): Новые перспективы для разновидности в шерсти – «Российские заводчики пытаются сохранить эту прекрасную породу»

RUSSIA: New prospects for the coated variety— “Russian breeders are trying to keep this wonderful breed alive.” Lucy Nikitochkina lives in the Russian capital, Moscow, and is the current President of the “Peruvian Hairless Dog” National Club (Национальный клуб породы “перуанская голая собака” — НКП перуанская голая собака), founded in February 2010 with the main …

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(In Russian): Новые перспективы для разновидности в шерсти – «Российские заводчики пытаются сохранить эту прекрасную породу»

Россия:

Новые перспективы для разновидности в шерсти –

«Российские заводчики пытаются сохранить эту прекрасную породу»

Автор статьи: Pedro Santiago Allemant

Опубликовано: 23 февраля 2019 года

Никиточкина Людмила и Флора (Hloris Flora van Edelsieger / перуанская голая собака разновидность в шерсти) Фото предоставлено Л. Никиточкиной

Людмила Никиточкина живет в столице России – Москве и является действующим Президентом Национального клуба породы «Перуанская голая собака», основанного в феврале 2010 году с целью защиты и популяризации этой породы.

«Наш клуб не крупный, но члены клуба настоящие энтузиасты породы. Клуб создан как команда единомышленников, которая работает вместе. Перуанская голая собака – это важнейший член нашего сообщества», – рассказывает она.

Кроме того, Людмила и Ольга, ее мама, с 1995 года занимаются собаками, они зарегистрировали питомник «ВАН ЭДЕЛЬЗИГЕР» / VAN EDELSIEGER, который занимается этой породой. Их питомник заработал титул лучший питомник породы перуанская голая собака в 2016 и 2017 году на чемпионатах Европы и мира. Кроме того, они не только обращают внимание на здоровье собак, делая тесты (глаза, ДНК, сердце и т.д.), но и занимаются физическим развитием своих собак (плавание и общие тренировки), чтобы их собаки находились в оптимальной кондиции и были здоровы, и чтобы семьи, которые выберут щенка из питомника, наслаждались обществом своих собак на протяжении продолжительного времени.

И мама, и дочь обожают национальные и международные выставки собак, так как именно на выставках все могут увидеть, что они добились в разведении, поскольку призовые места являются одним из способов показать достигнутое в отборе и разведении собак.

«Но мы только начинаем путь в использовании в разведении разновидности в шерсти», рассказывает Людмила.

Собор Василия Блаженного, Москва. Фото Mauricio Álvarez дизайн Alessandro Pucci appp-adpp©2019

Россия – это страна с населением свыше 142 миллионов. На настоящий момент в России насчитывается свыше 15 миллионов домашних собак, среди которых 250 собак породы перуанская голая собака и их число продолжает расти.

В России 5 питомников породы перуанская голая собака. Более того в этой стране есть национальный клуб, который занимается популяризацией породы. Важен и тот факт, что все питомники перуанской голой собаки занимаются двумя разновидностями: голой и в шерсти. (http://www.fci.be/es/statistics/ByNco.aspx?iso=RU)

 

Флора (Hloris Flora van Edelsieger / перуанская голая собака разновидность в шерсти) Фото предоставлено Л. Никиточкиной

«Мне было интересно почему у перуанской голой собаки нет шерсти», говорит Людмила. «Я много читала о гене FOXI3, который отвечает за отсутствие шерсти. И я знала, что в породе есть разновидность в шерсти. Моя первая перуанская голая собака в шерсти родилась раньше, чем стандарт от 13.08.2013 вступил в силу, поэтому не была включена в программу разведения питомника. Она родилась в моем питомнике. Ее кличка Avrora Astra Eos van Edelsieger, дома ее зовут Аврора. Именно Аврора научила меня, что разновидность в шерсти еще нежнее, чем голая. К сожалению, ее пришлось отдать как домашнего любимца и поэтому у нее не было потомков. Но после вступления в силу Нового Стандарта, я поняла, что я могу включить разновидность в шерсти в программу разведения. В настоящий момент, у меня несколько собак в шерсти, которые участвуют в разведении и успешно выступают на выставках».

FCI – стандарт FCI N° 310 – «Разрешение разновидности в шерсти принимать участие в выставках и разведении будет способствовать увеличению генетического разнообразия, что улучшит породу и привлечет новых заводчиков.»

 

 

Флора (Hloris Flora van Edelsieger / перуанская голая собака разновидность в шерсти) Фото предоставлено Л. Никиточкиной

 

FCI – стандарт FCI N° 310 – «…Ранее собак в шерсти исключали из разведения, но, в свете последних исследований их генома, признание собак в шерсти усилит генетическую ценность породы и будет способствовать ее развитию и сохранению. Разрешение разновидности в шерсти принимать участие в выставках и разведении будет способствовать увеличению генетического разнообразия, что улучшит породу и привлечет новых заводчиков.

Первоначально, регистрируются только собаки в шерсти, родители которых голые собаки, зарегистрированные должным образом в племенной книге или имеют родословные.

Собак в шерсти в дальнейшем можно вязать только с голыми представителями породы. Вязки между двумя представителями породы в шерсти запрещены. Запрещена также регистрация собак в шерсти в племенных книгах, в случае если родители собаки не зарегистрированы должным образом.»

Людмила Никиточкина и Флора (Hloris Flora van Edelsieger). Фото Mauricio Álvarez – appp-adpp©2019

Людмила рассказала нам, что проблема разновидности в шерсти во многом связаны с тем, что больше известна голая разновидность перуанской голой собаки, которая сама по себе выглядит довольно экзотично. Многие судьи недостаточно хорошо знают эту породу и разновидность в шерсти производит на них сильное впечатление. Однако это не обескураживает российских заводчиков, которые считают что это еще одно основание показать миру насколько прекрасны перуанские голые собаки в шерсти.

«Hloris Flora van Edelsieger», говорит Людмила, «– дома мы зовем ее Флора. Флора – малая перуанская голая собака хорошего типа, с шерстью песочного цвета, ее рост 33 см. Флора победитель класса на Чемпионате Европы 2017 и на чемпионате мира 2017. Флора успешно выступает на выставках и это прекрасный пример в кампании по признанию разновидности в шерсти. Кроме того, она выигрывала и у голых соперников, что я считаю огромным достижением.»

«На чемпионате мира 2017 в Лейпциге – Германия», продолжает Людмила, «было больше собак в шерсти (5 в шерсти и 67 голых, всего 72 собаки породы (https://www.wds2017.de/fileadmin/media/wds/meldestatistik/Statistic_of_entries_WDS_2017.pdf)

и я подумала, что именно собаки в шерсти ярко показывают тип, который предпочитает данный питомник. Фактически именно разновидность в шерсти помогает понять, что улучшить в голых собаках, тогда как голые представители не дают такой ясной картины. Если Вы внимательно посмотрите на собаку в шерсти, то Вы поймете, что некоторые собаки в шерсти выглядят больше похожими на другую породу, чем на перуанскую голую собаку.

Я люблю собак в шерсти, потому что они помогают мне идти к моему идеалу перуанской голой собаки.

Собака перуанской голой собаки в шерсти Hrista Citera Van Edelsieger, зав. Людмила Никиточкина.

«Некоторое время назад, – продолжает Людмила, – мы с европейскими заводчиками обсуждали тот факт, что в последнее время рождается все больше щенков в шерсти. К сожалению, в России собак в шерсти не оставляли до публикации нового стандарта, где данная разновидность официально признавалась как часть породы. Полагаю, что в Европе поступали таким же образом. Я думаю, что признание разновидности в шерсти – это их шанс на жизнь. Наша порода – уникальна и мы не должны терять при разведении генетический материал, который несут в себе собаки в шерсти. Я очень надеюсь, что разновидность в шерсти станет популярнее в моей стране. Наша страна большая и эта порода в двух своих разновидностях может сделать многих людей счастливее. Эта любящая порода, которая способна подарить море любви и счастья своим владельцам. В настоящий момент в Россию привезены

Храм Христа Спасителя в Москве. Фото: appp-adpp©2019

несколько великолепных представителей породы. Нам повезло встретить людей, которые также влюбились в породу и стали частью семьи нашего питомника. Качество собак, рожденных в России улучшается. Российские заводчики пытаются сохранить эту прекрасную породу».

 

 

 

For English, you can see the following link:

New prospects for the coated variety— “Russian breeders are trying to keep this wonderful breed alive.”

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The Coated Dog: Why this misunderstood and forgotten variant is key to the survival of the Peruvian Hairless Dog?

France is the first country in history to officially recognise the Coated Peruvian Hairless Dog!

Prejudice or bad precedent? What’s certain is that, after centuries of existence, the Peruvian Hairless Dog variant with coat is still considered by many as a “chusco” dog (mutt), or a genetic failure resulting from the crossbreeding of dogs without hair and dogs with coat. However, thanks to the committed work of an important few, light is being shed on the fact that this idea is not only absolutely wrong, but also harmful to the Hairless breed itself. Thus, stigma and discrimination are finally giving way to acceptance as this variant is being welcome in certain foreign countries, not only as an official breed in its own right, but also as one of great popularity in foreign homes.

2 or 3 dogs per litter that, unfortunately, in all probability would be sacrificed by the breeder at birth.

The Coated Peruvian Hairless Dog  was considered the embarrassment of the Hairless family, the weird uncle that must be hidden down in the basement at all cost. Meaning that the chances of finding a family that would want a Coated Hairless Dog were close to nil. Nonetheless, the average percentage of the Hairless Dog population born with hair is around 25%—that is, a probability of 2 or 3 coated dogs  in a litter of 6 to 8. These were 2 or 3 dogs per litter that, unfortunately, in all probability would be sacrificed by the breeder at birth.

Ella’Chakana de Kalidor (ejemplar hembra: Perro sin Pelo del Perú – variedad con pelo) de Estelle Anthoni Koch – Francia – appp-adpp ©2018

At the beginning of the 2000s, while I was participating in a canine championship, I asked a breeder the question: “What do you do when you have a coated dog in the litter?”

She replied: “If you have a coated one you eliminate it or you shoot yourself!”

This event aroused my interest and I immediately wanted to deepen my knowledge of this variant of the millenary Hairless breed to understand the incoherence of nature that produces—as genetic “failures”—individuals born almost exceptionally without a feature that, from another point of view, is in itself a genetic “flaw”: the lack of hair. My intention then was to find ways to avoid the hard-won prestige the Hairless Dog breed was finally beginning to obtain from being spoiled due to the existence of some specimens that did not fit within the accepted canons. In other words, the intention was to avoid having our Hairless Dog placed in the “Uncertain Breeds” bin (where breeds prone to genetic “flaws” go) just because of some coated individuals that were being born. What I would find, however, was much more dramatic and completely changed my perspective of the Hairless Dog and its variant with Coat.

To understand the coated variant, I said to myself, I have to first understand why dogs without hair exist. Thus, I entered little by little into a world of history, geography and genetics that brought me face to face with the direct “culprit”: the “FOXI3” gene. In turn, this brought me the most indisputable evidence in the case in favor of the coated Hairless Dogs.

It is better to cross a dog that was born without hair with another that was born with coat under certain criteria. [See Annex I for the breed standard – FCI].

Ejemplares Perro sin Pelo del Perú – variedad sin pelo y con pelo de Estelle Anthoni Koch (criadero de Korrantoh, Francia) – appp-adpp ©2018.

Biologist Víctor F. Vásquez Sánchez explains that the FOXI3 “is a gene that is present in several mammals and [that], in the case of the Peruvian Hairless Dog, manifests itself as a disease that causes hair loss and changes in its dentures.” He also explains that there are two variants of the same gene: one dominant, H, responsible for the lack of hair, and one recessive, h, not mutated, i.e. responsible for the fur. The gene exists always in pairs and, when the dominant variant is present in one of the copies, Hh, it will always be physically evident in the dog: the dog will be born without hair. On the other hand, if it so happens that both copies of the gene are recessive, hh, the dog will be born coated. And that both these possibilities occur in the same litter, i.e. that some individuals are Hh and others hh, is absolutely natural and inevitable. Which leads us to our first finding: that the Coated Hairless Dog is natural and inevitable.

But Vásquez Sánchez continues explaining something that is especially important for the future of the Hairless breed: he tells us that when two copies of the dominant variant, HH, are found in a dog, the FOXI3 gene becomes lethal, causing the death of the embryo. Which is exactly what “you want to avoid to preserve the breed,” he tells us. This means that for the survival of the animal it is necessary to ensure that the HH combination does not occur and this is achieved, says Vásquez Sánchez, by avoiding “crossing the Hairless Dog in a consanguineous and indiscriminate way: you must always cross it with other specimens,” as well as crossing a dog without hair with one of the same breed with coat, thus effectively eliminating the possibility that the hairless variant, H, of the FOXI3 gene is duplicated, causing the death of the embryo. (Vásquez Sánchez, Víctor F., FOXI3 —Biologist, MSc in Plant Biotechnology and full doctoral studies in Cell Genetics and Biology at the Autonomous University of Madrid – ARQUEOBIOS.)

Thus, I obtained not only the reason behind the lack of hair in this millenary breed, but also evidence of the importance of its coated variant in ensuring the survival of the breed itself. It was now clear to me that any attempt to get rid of the variant with coat would only put the Peruvian Hairless Dog on a direct path toward extinction. [See Annex II for more information regarding this finding.]

Luckily, shortly after beginning my research, the world began to change its the negative regard of Coated Hairless Dogs, too.

Magenta Sweety Punk, a female dog of the coated variant, becomes a World Champion!

World Dog Show – Milano 2015: Magenta Sweety Punk (ejemplar hembra de raza Perro sin Pelo del Perú – variedad con pelo – 1er ejemplar con pelo en la historia Vencedor de un campeonato mundial de la FCI) y Anja Čondrič de Croacia – appp-adpp ©2018.

In 1996, after several written requests, the Club de Chihuahua et chiens exotiques (CCCE), chaired by Mr. Goran Brick, received a favorable ruling from the French Société Centrale Canine (SCC) to schedule on the agenda of the next meeting of the Zootechnical Commission the discussion on the use of the Hairless Dog variant with hair in the breeding plan. (Club Français du Chihuahua, du Coton de Tuléar et des Exotiques – afilié à la Société Centrale Canine – agrée par le Ministére de l’Agriculture.)

Finally, the variant with hair was approved by the SCC on July 9, 2008, which marked a second triumph of the Peruvian Hairless Dog breed—the first having been its admission as an official breed thirteen years before.

This was only the beginning. The French breeders would not be satisfied with a national acceptance because for this variant to be recognised worldwide it had to have the approval of Peru, its country of origin. Nonetheless, according to European breeders, this variant was not officially recognised in Peru; only the specimen without hair was recognised, thus not taking into account the aforementioned genetic requirements.

Estelle Anthoni Koch, French breeder of Peruvian Hairless Dogs, explains to us the difficulties French breeders (first to demand the recognition of the Coated Hairless Dog) have faced and are still facing: “We have struggled for the coated ones to be recognised because, at first, nobody wanted to register them in the national pedigree like any other dog. Finally, France managed to be the first country to accept the registration of coated dogs; although, at first, we were still not allowed to present them in exhibitions. So a new struggle began to that end. In spite of this, [the Coated Hairless Dog] is still not well-represented because we see them very little in exhibitions. Even in terms of reproduction we don’t frequently keep them because a Peruvian Hairless Dog is, by definition, naked—we therefore don’t want to have many coated ones. I actually think it’s because we’re afraid our kennel will fill up with them. I admit that essentially it’s the naked variant we like best!”

At the same time, we must not forget that other European countries—Germany and Sweden, among them—also ventured into the recognition of the Coated Hairless variant in their breeding programs.

In 2010, Choopetta de Luna Capreza obtained the title of French Champion, thus becoming the first Coated Peruvian Hairless Dog in history to obtain such an award. This recognition placed France as a leading country in the recovery and protection of this millenary Peruvian race and Choopetta herself as a precursor of the variant with coat in said country, and the world.

Finally, in 2013 this variant was recognised by the Fédération Cynologique Internationale, giving way to the opening up of the Peruvian Hairless Dog pedigree to its new variant with Coat. Five years of struggle by French and European breeders so that their coated dogs could enter the official breeding programs finally paid off. Now the dream came true! (https://elcomercio.pe/lima/conoce-variedad-perros-peruanos-pelo-252165).

World Dog Show – Milano 2015: Lidija von Richet (Croacia), Roberto Velez Pico (juez canino de Puerto Rico – FCI) y Anja Čondrič (Croacia) con Nuevo Callao Pazzda y Magenta Sweety Punk (ejemplares macho y hembra de raza Perro sin Pelo del Perú – variedad sin pelo y con pelo (canes de República Checa y Croacia) – appp-adpp ©2018.

Thus, in 2015, for the first time in the history of the cynological world, Magenta Sweety Punk, a female Hairless Dog of the variant with coat, became a World Champion (World Winner)! In the true and surprising fashion in which this Peruvian millenary dog has today become an official citizen of the world, Magenta hails from a Belgian kennel and is owned by a Croatian.

 

 

Lidija Klemencic (Croacia) y Vita (Gruffalina’s Partner in Crime with WW – Ejemplar hembra de raza Perro sin pelo del Perú con pelo). Photo by Maurico Alvarez – appp-adpp ©2018

This victory is yet another motivation for European and Peruvian breeders and, in general, all who is interested in upholding the value of the Peruvian Hairless Dog in all its variants. But we must not forget the road that led to it. From the outside it is easy to dismiss the trials and tribulations of the Coated Peruvian Hairless Dog as eccentricities of a very specific group of people or, at best, evidence of how the world works: rejecting, segregating, only gradually evolving towards tolerance and acceptance. But behind these figures and statistics there are individuals affected by them over the many years before this struggle came to fruition: like all the coated dogs that were eliminated because they were different, and the breeders that were forced to abandon their activities as they became targets of criticism and defamation from those sectors that are reluctant to change.

ANNEX I: SCIENTIFIC FACTS

Can de variedad con pelo de padres sin pelo con incisivos muy deteriorados por la edad (FCI: En la variedad con pelo la dentición debe ser completa con dientes de desarrollo y posición normal (no debe faltar más de una pieza dental en la variedad con pelo). Foto : Arql. Teresa Rosales Tham, Perú.

The Peruvian Hairless Dog, Chinese Crested Dog and Mexican breeds are characterised by their scarce or absent fur, as well as their missing or deformed permanent dentures (5, 10). The journal Nature talks about the structure of the mandibular and maxillary premolars and the permanent molars associated with the FOXI3 gene in a historical pedigree collection of skeletons of Hairless Dogs with and without hair. This unique sample dating from the beginning of the 20th century onward is derived from a breeding experiment by Ludwig Plate (German zoologist and disciple of Ernst Haeckel in Jena) originally conceived to study the inheritance of both hair and skin characteristics. (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-017-05764-5.pdf)

Ludwig Plate wrote a work on Darwinism called “Thorough and Extensive Defence”. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ludwig_Hermann_Plate)

FCI-STANDARD N° 310 – PERRO SIN PELO DEL PERU (PERUVIAN HAIRLESS DOG)

http://www.fci.be/Nomenclature/Standards/310g05-en.pdf

ANNEX II: REMINDER OF THE FUNDAMENTAL FACTS (CCCE – France):

(Club Français du Chihuahua, du Coton de Tuléar et des Exotiques – afilié à la Société Centrale Canine – agree par le Ministére de l’Agriculture.)

The variant with hair is not the result of a genetic defect and excluding it from reproduction will not prevent the future and sustained birth of coated specimens.

If we accept the notion of the lethality of the FOXI3 gene (the “hairless” gene) when it is duplicated in the individual, we must also accept the result that all living specimens without hair have two different genes: one “hairless” and one “with hair”, being the “hairless” gene the dominant one and, therefore, the one that physically manifests itself in the individual. Thus, the mating of two naked specimens statistically produces 25% of coated dogs in the litter because each parent has a gene “with hair” to offer. The fundamental fact is that no eradication program can end this: necessarily and naturally there will be coated individuals.

Therefore, the variant with hair is not the result of a genetic defect and excluding it from reproduction will not prevent the future and sustained birth of coated specimens.

The elimination of the coated ones represents a loss of their genetic heritage. This sustained loss of genetic capital is catastrophic if we consider that this is an extremely rare breed.

Statistically, the mating of two Hairless Dog specimens results in:

  • 1/4 or 25% of viable specimens from two genes with hair”: these dogs are born with In France, in general, they were sacrificed, which represents a loss of their genetic heritage and, in addition, a contradiction to the position of the Commission of Animal Husbandry, which defends a genetic variability as great as possible in the breed. This sustained loss of genetic capital is catastrophic if we consider that this is an extremely rare breed.
  • 1/4 or 25% of nonviable specimens from two “hairless” genes: these dogs die in their embryonic state.
  • 2/4 or 50% of viable specimens from one “hairless” gene and one gene with hair”: these dogs are born without hair.

In reality, and due to the mortality of the specimens produced from two “hairless” genes, always at least 1/3 or 33% of the viable dogs are coated specimens.

In France, measures taken in favor of the inclusion of the variant with hair have been destined to help the breeding of the Peruvian Hairless Dog by:

  • An increase in the number of breeders,
  • Maintaining sufficient genetic variety, and
  • The reduction of prenatal and postnatal mortality due to a decrease in the breeding between two hairless subjects.

Finally, it should be noted that in most countries governed by the FCI this non-recognition prevented the variant with hair from being presented in exhibitions but did not exclude it in any way from the breeding plan. This practice evidently already represented a great advance in the breeding of the Hairless breed in Europe.

Thanks to:

Mr. Daniel Arnoult, current President of the Club CCCE (Club de Chihuahua et chiens exotiques).

Biol. Víctor Félix Vásquez Sánchez – Specialist in Bioarchaeology, Cell Biology and Genetics – Honorary Professor of the Department of Biology of the Autonomous University of Madrid. Director of ARQUEOBIOS.

France is the first country in history to officially recognise the Coated Peruvian Hairless Dog! Prejudice or bad precedent? What’s certain is that, after centuries of existence, the Peruvian Hairless Dog variant with coat is still considered by many as a “chusco” dog (mutt), or a genetic failure resulting from the crossbreeding of dogs without …

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